Discussion for Patient: Female Only The Female Only Group is usually a reflection of sugar handling difficulties compounded by liver-gallbladder dysfunction that classically affects adrenal function. High stress and the over-consumption of sugar and refined carbohydrates have led to most of the symptoms in this group. This problem is very common in our society because of the misunderstanding of the importance of good fats in our diet, and the overuse of carbo-hydrates. Much of the solution is accomplished by addressing the causes like sugar, chocolate, soft drinks, alcohol and caffeine intake, lack of rest, and too much emotional upset.

One of the best supports for most of the symptoms in this group is Dr. Page's Phase 1 & 2 Diet Plan which is low in refined carbohydrates, and high in quality carbohydrates.

SP: Symplex F

MH: Chaste Tree, Wild Yam Complex, Dong Quai

Nutritional Comments If you are looking at a symptom survey of a 45-year-old female and the female-only symptoms are the most predominant, look to liver and sugar handling difficulties, then the adrenals before addressing the ovaries and/ or uterus directly. Classically, the female group symptoms get there through Groups 3 and 5, and multiple responses in Group 7 and Female Only (undermining process of the other endocrine organs).

Much of the damage leading to female problems is due to pancreas endocrine/exocrine stress with sugar and refined carbohydrates, and the liver with poor quality lipid intake (fried foods, hydrogenated fats, etc.). The resultant adrenal stress and destabilization of the endocrine glands result in the typical symptoms of the Female Only Group. Much of the solution is accomplished by addressing the causes like sugar, chocolate, soft drinks, alcohol and caffeine intake, lack of rest, and too much emotional upset. One sure way to fail is to treat Female Only Group symptoms alone.

Progesterone is produced by the corpus luteum under the influence of LH. Low progesterone may be the result of thyroid insufficiency (which may be secondary to adrenal, anterior pituitary, or estrogen stress). Progesterone opposes estrogen. Placental and mammary concentrates have progesterone activity. Progesterone decreases bleeding. Progesterone insufficiency is typically associated with a menstrual cycle shorter than 28 days, heavy menstrual bleeding, fluid retention during menses, premenstrual tension dominated by nervousness, headache, nausea, and fluid retention, menstrual bleeding longer than 3 days, menstrual cramps, uterine fibroids, breast lumps and breast swelling with increased subcutaneous fluid, decreased systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure, decreased pulse and temperature, poor retention of sodium and chloride, vomiting and toxemia of pregnancy, uterine contractions during early pregnancy, and habitual miscarriage. Progesterone excess can be due to incomplete breakdown by liver, sympathetic, or sugar metabolic imbalances. Symptoms include a menstrual cycle longer than 28 days, scanty menstrual flow, acne, greasy hair and skin, or breast tenderness during menses, premenstrual depression, increased temperature, dry vagina and/or thick discharge, and excess retention of sodium, chloride, phosphorus and sulfur.

Estrogen is produced by the ovarian follicle under the influence of FSH. Estrogen insufficiency can be due to ovarian or pituitary insufficiency, and after menopause, adrenal insufficiency. Vitamin B6 reduces blood estrogen, and fiber binds estrogen in the gut preventing its reabsorption during enterohepatic re-circulation and thus may be reduced with fiber supplementation and vegetarian diets. Estrogen can also be lost in the feces if intestinal bacteria are destroyed since gut bacteria deconjugate estrogen for recirculation back into the body. Symptoms of estrogen insufficiency include increased diastolic blood pressure, a tendency to ulcers, sterility, pain, cramping, and tension during but not before menstruation, decreased menstrual blood flow, menstrual cycle longer than 28 days, a hypoplastic, weak uterus and senile vaginitis, menopausal hot flashes, anemia, poor retention of sodium, chloride, potassium and calcium, poor calcium assimilation, and excess retention of phosphorus.

Estrogen decreases the cycle length and causes fat deposits in the breasts. Estrogen production is stimulated by vitamin E which also reduces the above breast symptoms. Estrogen excess can also occur with liver overload preventing estrogen breakdown, parasympathetic dominance, excess fat or insufficient fiber intake that increases enterohepatic circulation, excess coffee, tea, vitamin E and chocolate. Features of excessive estrogen include reduced diastolic blood pressure, premenstrual tension dominated by nervousness, head-aches, nausea, & fluid retention, uterine smooth muscle cramps/spasms due to increased extracellular potassium/decreased intra-cellular calcium, watery vaginal discharge, excess menstrual flow lasting only 2-3 days, decreased thyroid effect due to impedance of T4 conversion to T3 with reduced temperature, tendency to vein problems, tendency to schizophrenia, an increased incidence of breast, lung, liver, and GI cancer, gynic qualities, increased calcium and phosphorus retention.

Discussion for Patient: Male Only The Male Only Group is about the prostate, as a rule ages 40-65. The big point about the prostate is that prostrate problems are secondary to bowel and toxicity problems. In the background of every prostate patient is a long-standing toxic bowel. Once again, you may try to treat the prostate only, without digestive and eliminative considerations. By so doing, you may relieve the patient, but you leave the cause uncorrected. Think of it this way, a toxic bowel is a stress on the prostate and benign prostate hypertrophy is a response to that stress. Zinc is an important co-factor in prostate function and should be considered as well.

SP: Symplex M, Prost-X, Spanish Black Radish

Nutritional Comments Men also go through a sort of male menopause called "andropause" in which the testes produce less testosterone after mid-life. Some common clinical findings with testosterone insufficiency are fatigue, reduced muscle energy, decreased secondary sex characteristics, reduced temperature, reduced blood pressure, cold sweaty hands, frequent/excessive urination, anemia, and compensatory prostatic hypertrophy. The blood chemistry may show elevated cholesterol, elevated glucose, and low phosphorus. Testosterone therapy has been useful for a variety of degenerative conditions including arthritis, heart disease, and peripheral vascular disease. Clearly, the notion that testosterone is merely a sex hormone discounts the profound effects it has on metabolism. It should be considered an anabolic steroid in both males and females.

Discussion for Patient:

Foundational Issues

This group looks at body chemistry out of control. The foundational issues emphasize the impact of today's lifestyle and diet. Foundational nutrition looks at function, not pathology, by going to the root causes and those relationships and interrelationships within the entire body as a complex system.

When one looks at foundational nutrition, he/she is looking at lifestyle and diet as it relates to sugar handling (liver, pancreas, adrenals), digestion, and liver/biliary function. On the surface, the patient has an endocrine system that is constantly vacillating and out of control. Emphasizing the impact of lifestyle and diet to a patient, while supporting these root causes, will assist in the disappearance of most patient complaints and symptoms.

SP: Cataplex B or G, Betafood, and Zypan

MH: Nevaton, DiGest, St. John's Wort

Notes on General Support

Dr. Lee and others knew this group, for the most part, as the Vitamin B questionnaire. The product support in this section brings focus to the need for vitamins B and E, biliary support, HCI, and pancreatic enzymes.

Many doctors using the Endocardiograph or the Acoustic CardioGraph found that the use of Cardio-Plus or Vasculin (depending on the blood pressure and pulse of the patient), produced more of a synergetic effect than the use of Cataplex B or G. Dr. Lee always felt that, ultimately, Cataplex B and G should be integrated at approximately a 2:1 or 3:1 ratio.

Drs. Melvin Page and Richard Murray used a blood pressure of 110/70 with a pulse rate of 68 as a parameter for the use of Cataplex G and B — elevated, use Cataplex G (vasodilator): below, use Cataplex B (vasoconstrictor).

Nutritional Comments

The foundational patient usually presents him/herself to the practitioner as one who has psychological issues as well as a lack of energy. The hormonal section usually will be quite full with answers. In reality, this is the patient who will never get well if he/she does not change diet and lifestyle. You will never be successful with such a patient if he/she doesn't make the changes.

Because of the marked increase in the consumption of refined carbohydrates (refined sugars, artificial sweeteners, refined flour and the products of these non-foods), these items that have calories, but little or no nutritional value, deplete the body of vitamin B complex and its associated nutrients. We are now seeing such a large number of these patients with a growing amount of symptoms associated with vitamin B deficiency, it is starting to be referred to as Vitamin B Complex Deficiency Syndrome.

With the Acoustic CardioGraph, these root causes reveal themselves in a prominent manner. As a result, the tracking of patient compliance is elevated greatly. For instance, if a patient with a perfect graph consumes one spoonful of refined sugar, within 30 minutes, the graph will show a marked breakdown in B metabolism in the aorta and pulmonary, as well as a slight congestion in biliary function in the mitral and tricuspid.

The impact of lifestyle and diet (sugar handling) can be confusing for the patient as well as the practitioner because the degenerative process is not immediate. The signs and symptoms may take years to emerge so in the patient's mind there is no relationship to their lifestyle and diet.

Discussion for Patient: Endocrine System (Hypoadrenal) Endocrine glands secrete hormones and other chemicals directly into the bloodstream. Some of the principal glands of the endocrine system are the thyroid gland, parathyroid glands, pituitary gland, adrenal cortex, pancreas, ovaries (female), and testes (male). The liver also plays an important role in metabolizing hormones and chemical messengers. Liver function must be considered whenever there is an imbalance of any endocrine gland. In addition, since each gland works in concert with the other glands, an imbalance of one affects the others.

The hormones produced by the endocrine glands are responsible for numerous body processes, including growth, metabolism, sexual activity, temperature regulation, and response to stress. Any increase or decrease in the production of a specific hormone affects the process it controls.

Like all parts of the body, endocrine glands need nutritional support. When under stress, either from psycho-logical factors (such as work, finances, relationships, etc.) or metabolic factors (such as hypoglycemia, excess oxidation, inflammation, infection, malnourishment, toxins, etc.), the endocrine glands are taxed. If they are not strong, well nourished, and supplied with their mineral and vitamin co-factors, they can weaken and become functionally insufficient. Unfortunately, lab tests do not tell the whole story, so many doctors miss this state of insufficiency because it is not outright failure/deficient. Similarly, an over-stimulated or over-active gland can cause significant symptoms, and yet the laboratory results will not show an outright excess. Nutritionally oriented practitioners may prescribe glandular extracts, vitamins, minerals, or stimulatory phytonutrients. Glandulars are primarily protein substances made from individual glands that supply the body with hormones, enzymes, nucleic proteins, and other active substances. Protomorphogens (PMGs) are another way to help the gland balance itself. A protomorphogen is a tissue extract intended to supply the specific determinant factors that improve the nutritional environment for that organ. Thus a protomorphogen will calm an overactive organ or support a weakened one without stimulation or inhibition. There can be no overdosage, but a temporary clearing effect may occur as the gland is brought into regulation if the dose is above a critical level. Otherwise, there are no side effects except as related to the proper function of the gland/ organ targeted by the PMG. A small amount can provide a remarkable rejuvenation.

SP: Drenamin, Cataplex B

MH: Licorice, Rehmannia, Eleuthero, Ashwaganda

Notes on General Support Drenamin is the great combination product built around adrenal protomorphogen. In addition to adrenal PMG, it contains Cataplex C for adrenal support plus Cataplex G. By adding Cataplex B, you are providing the complete pattern of the B Vitamin complex. The hypoadrenal patient closes off with cooked protein. Typical patient under stress: Drenamin for adrenals; Zypan and A-F Betafood for digestion.

Nutritional Comments Adrenal hypofunction can be accurately quantified with the postural hypotension test. There is a failure of the systolic pressure to rise on standing (so dizziness and weakness are produced upon arising). It is strongly associated with chronic low blood pressure and chronic fatigue (QUESTION #158). There is also a tendency towards hives, allergies, bronchitis, pneumonia, asthma, and arthritic tendencies (QUESTION #162). Crav¬ing salt is the result of hypoadrenal patients losing electrolytes. Weakness results after colds/influenza. In addition, this points to adrenal exhaustion. In fact, careful history taking will reveal a surprising number of patients whose health was never again as good as it was before a bad case of the flu. You can anticipate the central role of adrenal hypofunction in the problems of these patients. In the typical patient, it is necessary to provide Drenamin for adrenals, Zypan for hydrochloric therapy, and A-F Betafood for liver and biliary func¬tion: (1) Adrenal hypofunction (2) Need lbr hydrochloric acid therapy, and (3) Liver—biliary dysfunction. Resulting from the commutative effects of stress or of an overwhelming stress (emotional, chemical or physi¬cal in nature) is a nearly universal finding in our patients by the time they get to our offices. Indeed, adrenal hypofunction completes what might be called the clinical triad of adrenal hypofunction, need for hydrochloric acid therapy and liver-biliary dysfunction. It is this triad we must address successfully in almost all patients if we are to do our part in assisting them back to health.

Discussion for Patient: Endocrine System (Hyperadrenal) Endocrine glands secrete hormones and other chemicals directly into the bloodstream. Some of the principal glands of the endocrine system are the thyroid gland, parathyroid glands, pituitary gland, adrenal cortex, pancreas, ovaries (female), and testes (male). The liver also plays an important role in metabolizing hormones and chemical messengers. Liver function must be considered whenever there is an imbalance of any endocrine gland. In addition, since each gland works in concert with the other glands, an imbalance of one affects the others.

The hormones produced by the endocrine glands are responsible for numerous body processes, including growth, metabolism, sexual activity, temperature regulation, and response to stress. Any increase or decrease in the production of a specific hormone affects the process it controls.

Like all parts of the body, endocrine glands need nutritional support. When under stress, either from psycho-logical factors (such as work, finances, relationships, etc.) or metabolic factors (such as hypoglycemia, excess oxidation, inflammation, infection, malnourishment, toxins, etc.), the endocrine glands are taxed. If they are not strong, well-nourished, and supplied with their mineral and vitamin co-factors, they can weaken and become functionally insufficient. Unfortunately, lab tests do not tell the whole story, so many doctors miss this state of insufficiency because it is not outright failure/deficient. Similarly, an over-stimulated or over-active gland can cause significant symptoms, and yet the laboratory results will not show an outright excess. Nutritionally oriented practitioners may prescribe glandular extracts, vitamins, minerals, or stimulatory phytonutrients. Glandulars are primarily protein substances made from individual glands that supply the body with hormones, enzymes, nucleic proteins, and other active substances. Protomorphogens (PMGs) are another way to help the gland balance itself. A protomorphogen is a patented tissue extract intended to supply the specific determinant factors that improve the nutritional environment for that organ. Thus, a protomorphogen will calm an over-active organ or support a weakened one without stimulation or inhibition. There can be no overdosage, but a temporary clearing effect may occur as the gland is brought into regulation if the dose is above a critical level. Otherwise, there are no side effects except as related to the proper function of the gland/ organ targeted by the PMG. A small amount can provide a remarkable rejuvenation.The adrenals are small glands that sit atop each of the kidneys. They play a role in sugar metabolism, and stress and inflammatory response.

SP: Drenatrophin PMG

MH: Rehmannia, Ashwaganda

Nutritional Comments Adrenal hyperfunction is poorly represented in that portion of the population that comes to our offices for help with their health problems. This condition may arise as a response to a stressful life circumstance or, of course, from the over or under-functioning of another endocrine gland. As long as the adrenals rise to the challenge, however, the individual is usually of the impression that they are doing fine. Adrenal hyperfunction cannot be sustained indefinitely, of course. If the adrenals are finally exhausted, a complete clinical picture emerges.

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